Both Your Houses

Double Delivery

Mr. Pentland brings Christy a delivery from Asheville. However, her surprise is interrupted by Isaac McHone who delivers the news that Opal's baby girl has died. Christy is asked to help prepare the child for burial . . .

Pretty Baby

Christy learns that Opal forced her baby's heel and head to touch because she believed the child was "liver growed." Christy is horrified but Opal is convinced that she did the right thing. She admires her little girl's ribbons and thanks Christy for her help . . .

Down by The Lazy River

Christy accuses Neil of failing to educate the women of the cove about child care. Neil tells her that it is more complicated than she realizes. He informs her that Granny Barclay, the local midwife, is true Scotch Irish and her word is gospel. Any advice Neil could offer would only ring on deaf ears. He is just one man and can only do so much . . .

Let's Learn About Feuding

Christy tells David about her plan to introduce the children to "Romeo and Juliet" to educate them about the wrongness of feuding. David has to go to Knoxville to pick up supplies and is worried about Christy's safety because of the Taylor-Allen feud. He advises her to keep the doors locked while he is away. Ruby Mae and Rob Allen are selected to play the roles of Romeo and Juliet in the school play . . .

A Rose by Any Other Name

Christy is trying to concentrate on her work while Ruby Mae prances around the mission reciting her lines from the play. She admires Christy's perfume and sachet and wonders if they would make her smell nice. When Christy suggests taking a bath, Ruby Mae shudders at the idea. Only on New Year's and Easter will she immerse herself in water. Christy invites the girl to stay at the mission when she learns that Ruby Mae's parents are occupied elsewhere . . .

Partners in Crime

Miss Alice and Christy discover Tom McHone hiding outside the mission. He needs medical attention and they decide to sneak him inside . . .

Someone's at The Door

Bird's-Eye and his friends show up at the mission looking for Tom. Miss Ida denies having seen his whereabouts but Bird's-Eye doesn't believe her. When Bird's-Eye tries to break down the door, Miss Alice ventures outside and orders him to leave. With a bible in her hand, Miss Alice informs him that he will burn in hell if he does harm to anyone at the mission. As she speaks the words, lightening strikes and scares the men off. Bird's-Eye warns them that Tom can't hide forever. Inside, the ladies discover that Tom has disappeared . . .

Tracking Down Tom

After searching the next morning, Neil informs Miss Alice that Tom is nowhere to be found. David returns and is brought up-to-date on the situation. Neil blames David and his preaching for the trouble in the cove but David argues that he did the right thing. Christy admonishes the two for arguing when people are getting hurt . . .

Doe, A Deer, A Female Deer

Christy goes to the McHone cabin to comfort Opal. Upon her arrival, she encounters Bird's-Eye who is keeping an eye out for Tom. Opal tells Christy that Bird's-Eye courted her years ago and still harbors anger against Tom because he married her. When Opal and Bird's-Eye were courting, she glimpsed a different side of him. One day when the two were out walking they came across a doe and its fawn. Bird's-Eye killed the mother and broke the fawn's leg with a rock. After Opal became angry and hit him, Bird's-Eye made a splint for the fawn's leg . . .

Real Men Don't Hurt Animals

Opal reminds Bird's-Eye of the fawn and tells him that he was a real man when he fixed the animal's leg. Bird's-Eye claims that fixing animals isn't a man's job but Opal disagrees. She tells him that any man can pull a trigger but fixing takes more time. Bird's-Eye could be the one to change things in the cove . . .

Practice Makes Perfect

Zak Holt and Creed Allen get into a fight during a rehearsal of "Romeo and Juliet." Christy reminds the two boys about the story of the Monteque's and Capulet's. She points out that feuding is bad for everyone no matter where they live . . .

Eavesdropping Doesn't Pay

Opal goes to the mission with a basket of gingerbread to repay Christy for all of her help. She overhears Christy telling Ruby Mae that the baby's death was not an accident. When Opal learns that she broke the child's back she runs off into the woods . . .

An Eye for An Eye

Isaac comes to the mission and tells Christy that he's worried about his mother. Christy goes to the McHone cabin and finds Opal out in the back staring at her little girl's grave. Opal tells Christy that the Lord will punish her for what she has done . . .

Advice From Alice

Neil examines Opal and tells Miss Alice that he isn't sure when she'll recover. He blames Christy (his favorite activity) but Miss Alice says that ignorance is the cause not Christy. She advises him to see Christy . . .

I've Got Two Strong Arms and I Can Help

At the mission, Neil tells Christy that she isn't to blame for Opal's condition. He tries to comfort her but Christy will not be appeased . . .

Is It My Cooking?

Christy tries to entice Opal to eat but she continues to stare into space . . .

Man on A Mission

As Opal's children recite their prayers, Christy tells Miss Alice that she's worried about Opal. Miss Alice urges her not to give up on the woman. David returns from Knoxville and tells the ladies that he's taken care of Bird's-Eye Taylor . . .

Let's Do Lunch

On his way over to the McHone cabin, Bird's-Eye stumbles across his son Lundy. Lundy spies the game that his father is bringing to Opal and begs him for some food. Bird's-Eye throws him a piece of cornbread and tells him to wait at their cabin until he returns . . .

A Surprise Visitor

David and the Marshall surprise Bird's-Eye when he arrives at the cabin. As the Marshall handcuffs him, Uncle Bogg and Tom McHone arrive on the scene. Uncle Bogg informs the Marshall that as the county squire, he's got jurisdiction over Bird's-Eye. Bird's-Eye will have to be tried in his court . . .

Guilty Until Proven Innocent

Christy tells Miss Alice that only revenge will be served if Tom is tried by Uncle Bogg. Miss Alice says that she's afraid Bird's-Eye will hang even if he is innocent . . .

No One Is to Blame

With Opal in a trance, Tom is left to prepare the meals. He can't get the hang of making cornbread and begs Opal to come back to them. He doesn't blame Opal and couldn't stand the thought of losing her. Christy arrives in time to witness his speech and tells Tom that she feels responsible. Tom doesn't blame Christy for what has happened and feels that she is a comfort to Opal. Christy begs Tom not to let Bird's-Eye's trial to go on but Tom only wants justice for the shooting. He can't forgive Bird's-Eye because of the feud. Christy tries to reach Opal once more. She tells Opal that she is a good mother and that neither her baby nor God blame her for what happened. Opal begins to cry and the two embrace . . .

Nice Day for A Hanging

Neil and David try to stop Uncle Bogg and the others from hanging Bird's-Eye. Christy and Opal arrive and urge them to listen to Opal's story. Opal tells them that she saw the man that shot Tom. She admits that she doesn't know who the man was but is sure that it wasn't Bird's-Eye. The man in question was too big and clumsy and was crying. Opal points out that Bird's-Eye never cries. Bird's-Eye is released and Opal tells Tom that she did it to teach their children not to hate . . .

A Scented Gift

Creed and Zak give Ruby Mae a present that contains a skunk inside. Miss Ida promptly throws the girl in a tub of water. Ruby Mae begins to pray and is rewarded by having a bucket of water dumped over her head . . .

Wherefore Art Thou Juliet

Isaac gives Christy his prize pumpkin as a thank you for helping his mother. Miss Alice is planting crocuses in the schoolyard. She tells Christy that the flowers bring her hope of spring when they sprout at winter's end. The children are ready to begin "Romeo and Juliet" but Ruby Mae seems to be missing. When she arrives clean and well-groomed, everyone is stunned. All cheer as Rob recites his lines of love to Ruby Mae. Like the crocuses, the small victories of Ruby Mae and Isaac bring Christy hope of the future . . .

Caroline Kent